2012

January

Special Post: Why Mailer Matters

January 25, 2012

“Why Mailer Matters: Three Reasons”  

By J. Michael Lennon, authorized biographer and Professor Emeritus, Wilkes University

Presented at the Mailer-Jones Conference, Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas-Austin, November 10, 2011 

1.     Mailer was the key innovator in the new wave of participatory journalism that took place in the in the late 1950s and early 1960s. He argued that there were no immutable boundaries, no lines drawn in heaven, between the genres, and demonstrated this by drilling holes through all the watertight compartments dividing them. Mailer once described himself as “a Nijinsky of ambivalence,” and he was able to deploy the warring parts of his psyche as both actor and observer, protagonist and witness, and thus achieve the enviable status Walt Whitman described as “being in and out of the game, watching and wondering”—and doing. The consummate artistic control he exercised over his persona enabled him, in The Armies of the Night (1968) and succeeding works, to shift from The Beast to The Ruminant with ease, jumping from one to the other like circus acrobats leaping from one horse to another and then back again. Thus, he was able to avail himself of the techniques and powers of journalism, historical narrative, biography, autobiography, and the novel—always the master form for him because of its tendency to engulf and ingest other forms. I would add, however, that it was the idea of the novel, and its aspiration to range wide yet dive deep, that inspired and allowed him plunder and reshape the other forms. His actual novelistic achievements, while brilliant, sit in the second row behind his successes in the polemical essay and several kinds of nonfiction narrative, including one often passed over too quickly—biography. As Richard Poirier once wrote, Mailer was Melville without Moby-Dick, George Eliot withoutMiddlemarch, and Mark Twain without Huckleberry Finn. But with The Armies of the Night and The Executioner’s Song (1979), he has his Waldenand his Crime and Punishment.

2.      Mailer was the most important public intellectual in the American literary world for over 30 years, and along with other figures such as William Buckley, Saul Bellow, Gore Vidal and Susan Sontag, helped establish the creative writer as important a commentator as politicians, pundits and professors. Mailer presented his ideas and commentary on modern politics and culture in every major media venue, save the Internet, and he even dabbled there in his final years. No American writer going back to Mark Twain mastered the modes of communicating with a variety of audiences for as long or as well as Mailer. He wrote for every sort of magazine and journal, underground and aboveground—Partisan Review, Parade, Esquire, Playboy,Way Out, Fuck You: A Magazine of the Arts, Dissent, Life, Look, Village Voice, Nugget, the NYRB and the New Yorker—over 100 different periodicals. He appeared on every major talk show, and many obscure ones. People saw him with Charlie Rose and Dick Cavett, and heard him at 2 a.m. on a local radio show in Nevada. He spoke at most of the major universities in the country, making hundreds of appearances; he was on symposia and panels in a variety of venues. One of his wives said he would go the opening of an envelope. He could be counted on to present his point of view on the controversy du jour in a letter to the editor—hundreds—an essay, interview, live broadcast or a book. He was the cultural spokesperson for a generation, probably two, and was our hero, our man out on a limb talking a blue streak, fulminating against technology, pollution and plastic, worrying about our fragile democracy, and taking on all comers. No American writer—Christopher Hitchens (another Left Conservative) might be the closest—has yet come close to replacing him.

3.      Mailer was the most important chronicler of and commentator on the major events and figures of American life during the last half of the twentieth century. He had daring ideas and insights on the great events and phenomena of the period: the Depression and World War II, McCarthyism and the Hollywood blacklist, the Cold War, Black Power, the sexual revolution, Vietnam and civil disobedience, the Women’s Liberation Movement, technology and the space program, prize fights and political conventions (he covered six), and some of the most loved and hated persons of the 20th century: Muhammad Ali and Marilyn Monroe, Hemingway, Castro, Nixon, Gary Gilmore, Lee Harvey Oswald, Madonna, Jackie Kennedy, Picasso and Henry Miller, and at the end of his life, Adolph Hitler. The most important figure was John. F. Kennedy. No event in American history reverberated as long and hard for Mailer as Kennedy’s assassination. It was either the focus or the backdrop for eight of his books, from The Presidential Papers (1963) to Oswald’s Tale (1995). He owned two sets of the 26-volume Warren Commission Report, and was obsessed by the causes and effects of J.F.K.’s death and legacy. The Time of Our Time (1998), his 1300-page, one-volume anthology organized by the date of the events chronicled therein, is one of the few narrative works that can stand comparison to John Dos Passos’s chronicle of the first half of the 20th century, U.S.A. We would not know what America was about for a long stretch of years after WWII, not as well as we do, were it not for Mailer’s words.

In sum: Perhaps no career in American literature has been as brilliant, varied, controversial, public, productive, lengthy and misunderstood.

[Note: the phrase “out on a limb talking a blue streak,” or something close to it, is borrowed from a review read long ago, and not since located. Thanks to the reviewer, wherever he is ensconced.]

*****

Thank you to J. Michael Lennon for contributing this guest post. Guest posts are welcome! Email lori.may1@wilkes.edu if you would like to submit a post for the Wilkes creative writing community.

Call for Subs: Ginosko Literary Journal

January 18, 2012

Ginosko (ghin-océ-koe)
To perceive, understand, realize, come to know; knowledge that has an inception, a progress, an attainment. The recognition of truth by experience.

Ginosko Literary Journal is accepting short fiction and poetry, creative nonfiction, interviews, social justice concerns, and spiritual insights forGinoskoLiteraryJournal.com.

Editorial lead time: 1-2 months

Accepts simultaneous submissions & reprints; length flexible, accept excerpts. Receives postal submissions & email—prefer email submissions as attachments in Microsoft Works Word Processor, Rich Text Format or Word. Copyright reverts to author. Read year around.

Publishing as semiannual ezine. Check downloadable issues on website for tone & style. Downloads free, accept donations.

ezine circulation 7000+. Website traffic 500-750 hits/month.  Established in 2003. Member CLMP.

Also looking for books, art, music to post on website, and links to exchange.

Ginosko Short Fiction Contest: deadline May 1st, $12 entry fee, $500 prize.

Ginosko Literary Journal
Robert Paul Cesaretti, Editor
PO Box 246
Fairfax, CA 94978
GinoskoLiteraryJournal.com.

Omnidawn’s Chapbook Poetry Contest

January 11, 2012

New Contest Begins Jan 1st   

Open to all writers: no limitations on the amount of poetry a writer has published.

Omnidawn’s CHAPBOOK Poetry Contest  

Winner receives $1,000, publication, and 100 copies.

Entry fee: $15.00

Accepting electronic & postal submissions

January 1 – February 29, 2012.

Joseph Lease will judge.

All entrants with a U.S. mailing address who pay an extra $2 to cover shipping costs will be mailed a copy of any Omnidawn chapbook of their choice, or a copy of the winning chapbook when it is published. A complete list of all current Omnidawn chapbook titles is available at http://www.omnidawn.com/chapbook-catalog.htm.

For full details about all three of Omnidawn’s Poetry Contests (current & future) visit www.omnidawn.com/contest

Call for Subs: Superstition Review

January 4, 2012

Submissions Period Ends February 29th 

Superstition Review is now accepting submissions of art, fiction, poetry, and nonfiction for Issue 9 to be launched April 1, 2012.

Please visit www.superstitionreview.com to read submission guidelines and Issues 1 – 8.

February

Omnidawn’s Chapbook Poetry Contest

February 29, 2012

It appears the Contest Deadline for Omnidawn’s Chapbook Poetry Prize has been extended!

Open to all writers: no limitations on the amount of poetry a writer has published.

Omnidawn’s CHAPBOOK Poetry Contest  

Winner receives $1,000, publication, and 100 copies.

Entry fee: $15.00

Accepting electronic & postal submissions

January 1 – February 29, 2012  March 15, 2012.

Joseph Lease will judge.

All entrants with a U.S. mailing address who pay an extra $2 to cover shipping costs will be mailed a copy of any Omnidawn chapbook of their choice, or a copy of the winning chapbook when it is published. A complete list of all current Omnidawn chapbook titles is available at http://www.omnidawn.com/chapbook-catalog.htm.

For full details about all three of Omnidawn’s Poetry Contests (current & future) visit www.omnidawn.com/contest

The Hudson Prize – Early Bird Special

February 22, 2012

Now is a great time to enter your manuscript in The Hudson Prize! Now through the end of the month, save $10 off your submishmash submission (full rate $25, early bird rate $15).

Each year Black Lawrence Press will award The Hudson Prize for anunpublished collection of poems or short stories.

The winner of this contest will receive book publication, a $1,000 cash award, and ten copies of the book. Prizes awarded on publication. Past winners include Jo Neace Krause, (fiction) Daniel Chacón, (fiction)Abayomi Animashaun, (poetry),Patrick Michael Finn (fiction), Sarah Suzor (poetry), and B. C. Edwards(fiction).

 

Entry Period:

February 1 – March 31

Submission Fee:

Early bird rate $15; Full submission rate $25

How to Enter:

Visit http://blacklawrence.homestead.com/hudson.html for contest details and submission instructions.

Call for Subs: Missouri Review Audio Competition

February 15, 2012

The Missouri Review invites you to submit to our 2012 Audio Competition for a chance to win $1,000 and to have your entry published on The Missouri Review’s website. Send us your recordings of original poetry or prose or your audio documentaries on any subject. All you need is a computer, microphone, software such as GarageBand or Audacity, and a great script.This year, in an effort to expand the contest, we have opened submissions (previously $20) to a pay-by-donation entry fee. Your contribution of any amount includes a one-year, digital subscription to The Missouri Review,and all of your donation goes to support the production of The Missouri Review and its related programs.

Winners and select runners up will have their work featured on The Missouri Review’s website and as part of our iTunes podcast series. Entries will be judged by TMR’s editors in collaboration with guest judge Julie Shapiro of the Third Coast International Audio Festival.

Deadline: March 15th, 2012

Entries and payments are accepted by mail or online. For details, or to submit, please visit our website:http://www.missourireview.com/audiovisual/submissions/

Call for Subs: Kenyon Review Short Fiction

February 8, 2012

Here’s another great opportunity for students and grads…

The Kenyon Review is now accepting submissions for the fifth annual Kenyon Review Short Fiction Contest through February 29, 2012. The contest is open to all writers who have not yet published a book of fiction. Submissions must be 1,200 words or less to qualify for the contest. Nancy Zafris, former KR Fiction Editor and currently editor of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction book series, will be the final judge.

The Writer 2012 Short Story Contest

February 1, 2012

The Writer, in collaboration with Gotham Writers’ Workshop, invites your original, unpublished short stories up to 2,000 words for the 2012 short stort contest.

Entries will be judged based on creativity, sense of story, characterization, and overall quality of writing, including grammar, punctuation and syntax. Writers may submit more than one story, but each story must be accompanied by a separate entry fee. Complete rules and FAQs are available at WriterMag.GothamWriters.com.

Contest prizes:
First prize: $1,000; a free 10-week creative writing workshop offered online by Gotham Writers’ Workshop ($420 value); publication in The Writerand on WriterMag.com; and a one-year subscription to The Writer.

Second prize: $300; free enrollment in a four-week How to Get Publishedseminar taught online by a literary agent and Gotham Writers’ Workshop ($150 value); publication on WriterMag.com; and a one-year subscription toThe Writer.

Third prize: $200; free enrollment in a four-week How to Get Publishedseminar taught online by a literary agent and Gotham Writers’ Workshop ($150 value); publication on WriterMag.com; and a one-year subscription toThe Writer.

Entry fee: $10 per story submitted. Winners will be notified by e-mail by Aug. 15, 2012

All entries must be submitted online by midnight (EDT) on April 30, 2012.

Complete rules and FAQs are available at WriterMag.GothamWriters.com.

March

Call for Graduate Writing: 18th Annual Southern Writers/Southern Writing Conference

March 28, 2012

The 18th Annual Southern Writers/Southern Writing Conference, a University of Mississippi graduate student event held in conjunction with the university’s Annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference, will take place July 12-14, 2012.

In addition to critical abstracts exploring Southern literature and writers, conference directors invite creative writers CURRENTLY ENROLLED IN GRADUATE PROGRAMS to submit poetry, short stories, or novel excerpts that deal with Southern themes or settings. Accepted creative entries will be featured on several panels. There will also be a nighttime reading and reception at Off-Square Books in downtown Oxford.

The conference reading limit is 15 minutes. Please send entire creative works to <swswgradconference(at)gmail.com> (replace (at) with @). Please send your submissions as Word attachments and include your university affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. The deadline for submissions is 5:00pm on Monday, April 2nd, 2012.

For more information, contact Paul Dean (Creative Chair) or Victoria Bryan (Conference Chair) at <swswgradconference(at)gmail.com> (replace (at) with @)

A Thrilling Opportunity: AgentFest 2012

March 21, 2012

ThrillerFest, an annual four-day celebration of thriller books, the authors who write them, and the fans who read them, will take place July 11-14, 2012 at the Grand Hyatt Hotel located in Midtown Manhattan. This is where you’ll find CraftFest and AgentFest, two great opportunities for emerging thriller writers.

AgentFest is designed to put authors and agents together for the purpose of pitching projects. The event is set up like speed-dating: you pitch your novel to an agent for a few minutes, get the agent’s reaction, and then move on to a different agent.

The 2012 event has confirmed over 50 top-level agents and editors, each searching for the next bestselling author. That could be you! Time to buckle down, finish your manuscript, polish your prose, and prepare for this annual event. Last year, eight attendees signed with their dream agent.

For a list of participating agents, as well as what they are looking for and their current client lists, please visithttp://www.thrillerfest.com/agentfest/participating-agents/.

If you wish to attend AgentFest, you must also register for CraftFest. For registration information, go to http://www.thrillerfest.com/registration/.

2012 Kenyon Review Writers Workshop

March 14, 2012

There are still spaces left!

Join the Kenyon Review this summer for an exciting, generative, and process-based workshop led by poet Jake Adam York.

York’s poetry navigates the relationship between art, memory, and history. In his work, the lyric invention that is a poem confronts the recorded truths of history, learning to speak a double language. His poetry radiates with a fidelity to factual detail, and a parallel obligation—via poetry’s capacity—to delight and to make the past meaningful in new and important ways. This is especially true in his ongoing series Inscriptions for Air, dedicated to elegizing the martyrs of the Civil Rights Movement.

The 2012 Kenyon Review Writers Workshop runs from June 16th-23rd. The workshops are generative in nature, and participants can expect to work on new material each day. The workshop takes place at Kenyon College, recently named by Forbes as one of the world’s most beautiful college campuses. Join us for Jake Adam York’s workshop! All experience levels are welcome.

To learn more about the workshop, find application details at http://www.kenyonreview.org/workshops/writers/

Jake Adam York is the author of three books of poems—Persons Unknown(2010), A Murmuration of Starlings (2008), winner of the 2009 Colorado Book Award in Poetry, and Murder Ballads (2005), winner of the 2005 Elixir Press Prize in Poetry. His poems have appeared in Cincinnati Review, DIAGRAM, Greensboro Review, New South, Northwest Review, Shenandoah, Southern Review, Third Coast, and other journals. York was the 2011 Richard L. Thomas Visiting Professor of Creative Writing at Kenyon College and is a 2011-2012 Visiting Faculty Scholar at Emory University’s James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference. Originally from Alabama, York is Associate Professor of English and Director of Creative Writing at the University of Colorado Denver, where he co-edits Copper Nickel. He currently blogs for The Kenyon Review; you can read his posts here.

The Norman Mailer Writers Colony

March 7, 2012

From Lawrence Schiller

Provincetown, MA, beautiful coastal community of artists and thinkers, is ready to welcome you to the fourth season of summer workshops and fellowships at the Norman Mailer Writers Colony. Mailer’s living room, looking out over Cape Cod Bay, will again host emerging and mid-career writers who wish to further their craft with the company and guidance of distinguished authors, faculty and visitors.

During 2012, the Center and the Writers Colony will offer workshops from May 19, through September 15, in various areas of creative writing. These workshops are open to students and writers through an application process which is based on merit. The faculty for these workshops are established teachers, writers and editors. Applications and a list of creative writing workshops for 2012 are available now on the Colony web site. Each workshop application has its own closing date between March 16 and April 30, 2012.

Click here for more information.

One-week Workshops: in memoir, poetry, screenwriting, fiction (selling a novel; revitalizing fiction; writing character), playwriting (staging and script analysis; writing inspired by August Wilson) , and of course, creative nonfiction (travel writing; developing voice; historical narrative; longform Internet journalism; methods of the New Journalism; ethical & legal concerns)

Four-week Fellowships: in fiction, nonfiction and poetry with mentors Jeffery Renard Allen, Gregory Curtis and Meena Alexander

Labor Day Week Retreat: one week of quiet, unprogrammed time to focus on your manuscript

Please join us for another beautiful summer at the Mailer Colony.

April

Accents Poetry Chapbook Contest

April 25, 2012

2012 Poetry Chapbook Contest

(Click here to download the submission form)

Accents Publishing is happy to announce its 2012 Poetry Book Contest.Two winners will be selected – one by an independent judge, Lynnell Edwards, and one by the Senior Editor and founder of Accents Publishing, Katerina Stoykova-Klemer. Each winner will have his/her submission published and will receive a $250 cash prize and 25 perfect-bound copies. All contest entries will be considered for regular publication with Accents Publishing, as well.

The entry fee is $10.00. Multiple submissions are allowed, as long as each one is accompanied by a separate entry fee and submission form. Winning books may be pre-ordered at the time of submission for $5.00 each.

A complete submission should include the following:

  • A completed submission form
  • Your manuscript, including:
    • An acknowledgement page, if necessary
    • Two title pages — one with name and contact information, one without
  • Your biography or CV
  • A check or a confirmation of payment via Paypal (see below) covering the $10 entry fee, plus any optional book pre-orders

Please do not include a SASE, as notification will be made by email only.

We will accept submissions until June 30th. Winners will be announced in July. The contest is open to any poet writing in English. Employees of Accents or family members of judges are ineligible to participate. Simultaneous submissions will be accepted, but please notify us immediately if your manuscript is accepted for publication elsewhere.

Manuscripts should conform to the following guidelines:

  • 20 to 30 pages of poetry
  • Table of contents
  • Single spaced
  • Numbered pages
  • 11 pt font minimum

Your name should not appear anywhere within the manuscript. Please do not send the only copy of your work, as manuscripts will be recycled.

Entries should be mailed to:

Accents Publishing
Attn: Katerina Stoykova-Klemer
P.O. Box 910456
Lexington, KY 40591-0456
USA

More information about Accents Publishing is available athttp://www.accents-publishing.com.

Wilkes Information Sessions

April 18, 2012

Learn more about graduate studies at Wilkes

Have you considered a Creative Writing MA/MFA from Wilkes University? Join us for an upcoming Information Session to learn more about how Wilkes can help you meet your creative goals.

Incoming and prospective students can meet faculty members and learn about individual programs of study, financial aid and student services. All sessions are from 6 to 8 p.m.

Future dates include:

Monday, April 23, 2012

Monday, August 13, 2012

Monday, December 3, 2012

All Wilkes-Barre information sessions are held in the Ballroom in the Henry Student Center, 2nd Floor, 84 West South St. Light refreshments will be served.

Registration begins at 6 p.m.orclick here to register online. 

For more information or to pre-register, call (570) 408-4235 or (800) WILKES-U Ext. 4235.

Click here for directions to campus.

Pocono Location

We are also pleased to announce we will have monthly information sessions at the Pocono location, located at the Shoppes at Crossroad on 611 in Bartonsville (next to Giant Food Store). We invite prospective students to come by the site and learn about the programs offered in the Poconos. All sessions are from 6 to 8 p.m.

Future dates include:

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

Wednesday, June 6, 2012

Wednesday, July 11, 2012

All Pocono information sessions are held at the Bartonsville location. Light refreshments will be served.

Registration begins at 6 p.m.orclick here to register online.

For more information or to pre-register, call (570) 408-7000 or (800) WILKES-U Ext. 7000.

Massachusetts Poetry Festival

April 11, 2012

April 20th – April 23rd

Get out your calendars! If you’re looking for a great getaway filled with poetry workshops and readings, you’ll want to check out the Massachusetts Poetry Festival.

This three-day event will bring 1,500 poets and poetry lovers to Salem, showcase a variety of extraordinary local and regional poets, and engage the public through poetry readings, interactive workshops, panel discussions, music, film and visual arts, and performances geared toward a diverse statewide audience.

For more info and registration details, visithttp://masspoetry2012.crowdvine.com/

River Teeth Nonfiction Conference

April 4, 2012

The Inaugural River Teeth Nonfiction Conference

May 18-20, 2012

Are you looking for an intensive weekend to focus on your nonfiction? JoinRiver Teeth in Ashland, Ohio for two full days of manuscript consultations, seminars, readings and community, all focused on the craft of nonfiction.  The conference will focus on literary journalism, essay, and memoir.

Featured Guests include Robert Atwan, the Series Editor of The Best American Essays, and Hope Edelman, author of five nonfiction books including the bestsellers Motherless Daughters and The Possibility of Everything, which was recently optioned for film.

Registration Info

Your conference registration fee includes a one-hour individual manuscript consultation, admission into all panels, seminars, social events, book signings, and open-mics, breakfast Saturday and Sunday mornings, and a complimentary one-year subscription to River Teeth.

Students currently enrolled in creative writing programs are eligible for a $50 discount.

For more info, visit http://www.riverteethjournal.com/conference

Enjoy River Teeth here: http://www.riverteethjournal.com

May

Poetry Contest: The MacGuffin

May 30, 2012

It’s not too late to enter The MacGuffin’s 17th National Poet Hunt Contest judged by Dorianne Laux!

The author of the winning poem will receive $500.

Two honorable mentions will be awarded as well.

All entrants receive one free copy of the Winter 2013 issue of The MacGuffin.

Please send up to five poems, an index card with your contact information and poem titles, and a check or money order for $15 (made out to Schoolcraft College) to:

The MacGuffin • Schoolcraft
College • 18600 Haggerty Rd. • Livonia, MI 48152.

More info at http://www.macguffin.org.

Postmark deadline: June 4.

Complete guidelines at:
http://www.schoolcraft.edu/macguffin/documents/contest-rules-2012.pdf

Wilkes Seeks Low-Res Associate Director

May 23, 2012

Wilkes University invites applicants for an Associate Director in the Graduate Writing Program beginning July 2012.

Wilkes University is an independent institution of higher education with approximately 2,400 undergraduate students & over 3,000 graduate students FTEs. The University is located in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, a mid-sized city within two & one-half hours driving distance of New York City & Philadelphia. For more information about Wilkes University, please visit www.Wilkes.edu.

The Wilkes Graduate Creative Writing offers a Master of Arts & Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing in the following areas: poetry, fiction, nonfiction, screenwriting, & playwriting. This low residency program is one of the largest in the country with students & faculty from 34 states. The office also hosts & supports Etruscan Press & SenArt Films projects.

The successful candidate is responsible for marketing, advising, fund-raising, program & curriculum development, recruiting, & program administration. A Master of Fine Arts or PhD with a creative dissertation is required. The ideal candidate will have prior experience in recruiting, program marketing, IT social media, online teaching, & course development experience. Salary is commensurate with qualifications & experience.

To apply send Curriculum Vitae, letter of interest, education philosophy statement, & references by May 20, 2012 to: Wilkes University, Associate Director Search, Reference # S00601, P.O. Box 3924, Scranton, PA 18505-0924. To apply by email, send application materials as listed above to: eapply@wilkes.edu. Include the reference # on the mailing envelope, or in the email subject line.

Indicate in your letter where you found out about the position vacancy. Please make sure to include the reference # or the application will not be processed. Wilkes University is constantly seeking to become a more diverse community & to enhance its capacity to value & capitalize on the cultural richness that diversity brings. The University strongly encourages applications from persons with diverse backgrounds.

The Black River Chapbook Competition

May 16, 2012

The Black River Chapbook Competition

Deadline: May 31, 2012

The Black River Chapbook Competition is a semi-annual prize from Black Lawrence Press for a chapbook of short stories or poems. Entries should be between 16 and 36 pages in length. The winner will receive $500 and publication. Previous winners of The Black River Chapbook Competition include Helen Marie Casey, Frank Montesonti, D. E. Fredd, Sandra Kolankiewicz, Tina Egnoski, T. J. Beitelman, David Rigsbee, Lisa Fay Coutley, Amelia Martens, Charlotte Pence, Russel Swensen, and Nick McRae.

How to Enter

Please follow this link for information on how to submit your manuscript for The Black River Chapbook Competition.

The deadline for submissions is May 31.

2012 Emerging Writers Getaway Contest

May 9, 2012

 

The Whidbey Writers MFA Alumni Association presents
Pulitzer Prize winning author William Dietrich

as final judge of their 2012 Emerging Writers Getaway Contest!

Click HERE to submit and for more details.

Contest Category

 2012:   Fiction – Novel Length

Schedule

Open for submissions: Feb. 15, 2012
Closed for submissions: May 15, 2012
Finalists Notified: June 26, 2012
Finalists’ Provide Full Manuscript: June 29, 2012
Winners Announced: August 5, 2012


Awards and Benefits

Ten finalists’ entries will be read and judged by Pulitzer Prize winner William Dietrich.

Additionally, Andrea Hurst Literary Management is offering the winning entry a full read/critique (as well as possible representation or referral).  The second and third place winners will also receive agent responses (from Andrea Hurst Literary Management) to their synopses, complete with critique/suggestions.

The names and novel titles to the top ten finalists will be posted on theWhidbey Writers MFA Alumni Association website on June 23, 2012.

The top ten entries will receive two critiques of their entry by members of the Whidbey Writers MFA Alumni Association.

Awards will be given as follows:

First Place

SecondPlace

Third Place

 

Entries must be RECEIVED BY MAY 15, 2012.

Read all the details and guidelines at http://www.whidbeymfaalumni.org/?page_id=862.

Job Opp: Wilkes Low-Res Associate Director

May 2, 2012

 

Wilkes University invites applicants for an Associate Director in the Graduate Writing Program beginning July 2012.

Wilkes University is an independent institution of higher education with approximately 2,400 undergraduate students & over 3,000 graduate students FTEs. The University is located in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, a mid-sized city within two & one-half hours driving distance of New York City & Philadelphia. For more information about Wilkes University, please visitwww.Wilkes.edu.

The Wilkes Graduate Creative Writing offers a Master of Arts & Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing in the following areas: poetry, fiction, nonfiction, screenwriting, & playwriting. This low residency program is one of the largest in the country with students & faculty from 34 states. The office also hosts & supports Etruscan Press & SenArt Films projects.

The successful candidate is responsible for marketing, advising, fund-raising, program & curriculum development, recruiting, & program administration. A Master of Fine Arts or PhD with a creative dissertation is required. The ideal candidate will have prior experience in recruiting, program marketing, IT social media, online teaching, & course development experience. Salary is commensurate with qualifications & experience.

To apply send Curriculum Vitae, letter of interest, education philosophy statement, & references by May 20, 2012 to: Wilkes University, Associate Director Search, Reference # S00601, P.O. Box 3924, Scranton, PA 18505-0924. To apply by email, send application materials as listed above to: eapply@wilkes.edu. Include the reference # on the mailing envelope, or in the email subject line.

Indicate in your letter where you found out about the position vacancy. Please make sure to include the reference # or the application will not be processed. Wilkes University is constantly seeking to become a more diverse community & to enhance its capacity to value & capitalize on the cultural richness that diversity brings. The University strongly encourages applications from persons with diverse backgrounds.

June

First Book Contest in Poetry: Crab Orchard Series

June 27, 2012

2012 First Book Award ~ $3500 and publication
http://craborchardseriesinpoetry.submishmash.com/submit

final judge: Chad Davidson

Below are the guidelines for the 2012 Crab Orchard Series in Poetry First Book Award, which will be open for entries on May 10, 2012 and close on July 7, 2012 (postmark and online submission deadline):

A first book of poems will be selected for publication from an open competition of manuscripts, in English, by a U.S. citizen or permanent resident who has neither published, nor committed to publish, a volume of poetry 48 pages or more in length in an edition of over 500 copies* (individual poems may have been previously published; for the purposes of the Crab Orchard Series in Poetry, a manuscript which was in whole or in part submitted as a thesis or dissertation as a requirement for the completion of a degree is considered unpublished and is eligible). Current or former students, colleagues, and close friends of the final judge, and current and former students and employees of Southern Illinois University and authors published by Southern Illinois University Press are not eligible. For questions about judging, please visithttp://CrabOrchardReview.siu.edu/conpo3.html.)

The winner will receive a publication contract with Southern Illinois University Press, and will be awarded a $2000 prize. The winner will also receive $1500 as an honorarium for a reading at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.

SUBMISSION PERIOD / DEADLINE: All entries must be postmarked or submitted online between May 10, 2012 and the end of July 7, 2012 (online entries will be accepted until 11:59:59 PM (CDT) on July 7, 2012). (For postal submissions since this is a postmark deadline, there is no need to send Express Mail, Fedex, or UPS. First Class or Priority Mail are preferred.) Please do not send revisions of either postal or online submissions; the winner will be given an opportunity to work with the series editor before the manuscript is delivered to SIU Press.

ENTRY FEE: $25.00 per entry for postal submissions; $28.00 per entry for online submissions through Submittable ($25.00 plus $3.00 online processing fee). Entry fees will not be refunded for manuscripts withdrawn by the author. All entrants will receive a year’s subscription to CRAB ORCHARD REVIEW, beginning with the 2013 Winter/Spring CRAB ORCHARD REVIEW.

PAGE LENGTH: Manuscripts are recommended to be a minimum of 50 pages to a recommended maximum of 75 pages of original poetry.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR POSTAL SUBMISSIONS: Manuscripts should be typewritten, single-spaced. Include a Table of Contents. No more than one poem should appear on a page. Submit two title pages for the collection. The author’s name, address, and daytime phone number should appear on the first title page only. The author’s name should appear nowhere else in the manuscript. An acknowledgments page listing poems previously published in magazines, journals, or anthologies should be placed after the second title page. A clean photocopy is recommended, bound with a spring clip or placed in a plain file folder (no paper clips or staples please). Please do not send your only copy of the manuscript since manuscripts will not be returned, and please do not include illustrations. CRAB ORCHARD REVIEW and Southern Illinois University Press assume
no responsibility for damaged or lost manuscripts.

All postal submissions must be accompanied by a $25 entry fee (check or money order). Please make your check out to “Crab Orchard Series in Poetry.”

Please address postal submissions to:

Jon Tribble, Series Editor, First Book Award, Dept. of English, Mail Code 4503,
Southern Illinois University Carbondale, 1000 Faner Drive, Carbondale, IL 62901

Include a self-addressed, stamped envelope for notification of contest results. If you would like confirmation that the manuscript has been received, please include a self-addressed, stamped postcard as well.

http://craborchardseriesinpoetry.submishmash.com/submit

INSTRUCTIONS FOR ONLINE SUBMISSIONS: Online entries should be sent through Submittable (there is an additional $3.00 processing fee for online entries, making the entry fee for each online entry $28.00). Payment for online submissions must be made online.

Please submit your file in .doc, .docx, .rtf, .txt, .pdf, .odt, or .wpf. 12-point font, Times New Roman or Times preferred. Manuscripts should be
single-spaced. Include a Table of Contents. No more than one poem should appear on a page.

Submit a single title page with only the manuscript title in your file.

The author’s name should appear nowhere in your file or in the file name.

In the place of the cover letter or biographical note in the submission process, an acknowledgments page listing poems previously published in magazines, journals, or anthologies can be included, but this SHOULD NOT be included in the manuscript file.

Please name your file the first eight letters of your manuscript title, with no spaces; for example, if your manuscript was titled “A Collection of Poems,” your file would be titled “acollect” or “ACOLLECT” (either lower or upper case is fine). If your manuscript title has fewer than eight letters or uses numerals, use what you have. If you have a symbol or mark of punctuation as your title or as part of your title, spell out what it stands for and use the first eight letters of that; for example, if your manuscript was titled “Poems!,” your file would be titled “poemsexc” for “Poems exclamation point.”

All entrants submitting online through Submittable will be notified of the results via e-mail by October 1, 2012.

SIMULTANEOUS SUBMISSION: Manuscripts may be under consideration elsewhere, but the series editor must be informed immediately if a collection is accepted for publication. Entry fees will not be refunded for manuscripts withdrawn by the author.

Entrants are not to contact the final judge under any circumstances; all questions should be directed to Jon Tribble, Series Editor of the Crab Orchard Series in Poetry.

Last Call: Accents Poetry Contest

June 20, 2012

2012 Poetry Chapbook Contest

(Click here to download the submission form)

Submissions due by June 30th.

Accents Publishing is happy to announce its 2012 Poetry Book Contest.Two winners will be selected – one by an independent judge, Lynnell Edwards, and one by the Senior Editor and founder of Accents Publishing, Katerina Stoykova-Klemer. Each winner will have his/her submission published and will receive a $250 cash prize and 25 perfect-bound copies. All contest entries will be considered for regular publication with Accents Publishing, as well.

The entry fee is $10.00. Multiple submissions are allowed, as long as each one is accompanied by a separate entry fee and submission form. Winning books may be pre-ordered at the time of submission for $5.00 each.

A complete submission should include the following:

  • A completed submission form
  • Your manuscript, including:
    • An acknowledgement page, if necessary
    • Two title pages — one with name and contact information, one without
  • Your biography or CV
  • A check or a confirmation of payment via Paypal (see below) covering the $10 entry fee, plus any optional book pre-orders

Please do not include a SASE, as notification will be made by email only.

We will accept submissions until June 30th. Winners will be announced in July. The contest is open to any poet writing in English. Employees of Accents or family members of judges are ineligible to participate. Simultaneous submissions will be accepted, but please notify us immediately if your manuscript is accepted for publication elsewhere.

Manuscripts should conform to the following guidelines:

  • 20 to 30 pages of poetry
  • Table of contents
  • Single spaced
  • Numbered pages
  • 11 pt font minimum

Your name should not appear anywhere within the manuscript. Please do not send the only copy of your work, as manuscripts will be recycled.

Entries should be mailed to:

Accents Publishing
Attn: Katerina Stoykova-Klemer
P.O. Box 910456
Lexington, KY 40591-0456
USA

More information about Accents Publishing is available athttp://www.accents-publishing.com.

Women and Place Anthology Seeks Submissions

June 13, 2012

Call for Submissions: Women & Place Anthology

Sundress Publications is currently looking for submissions from women for a multi-genre anthology (poetry, fiction, and nonfiction) centered on the idea of “place” to be published in October 2013. All (re)interpretations welcome, including — but not limited to — the following:

home * region * neighborhood * niche * background responsibility * community vacancy * property space * venue * profession * establish * distinguish

Please limit submissions to no more than five (5) poems or 5,000 words. Previously published works accepted though please let us know where the piece first appeared.

All questions and submissions may be sent to <anthology(at)sundresspublications.com> (replace (at) with @ when sending email)

For more information, visit our website athttp://www.sundresspublications.com

Visiting Position in Creative Writing: Marlboro College

June 6, 2012

Marlboro College, a liberal arts college of 300 students and 41 faculty members, invites applicants for a Visiting Professor of Writing for a one-year sabbatical replacement, beginning August 2012. Teaching responsibilities include teaching a Fiction Workshop in the fall and a Poetry Workshop in the spring, tutorial support for advanced students in Writing, with an additional literature course or two (depending on the tutorial load) each semester in the applicant’s area of expertise. MFA or PhD required.

Marlboro receives the highest academic rating from the Princeton Review and is noted for its intellectual rigor and lively classroom discussion. We are committed to the development of clear writing and a global perspective. Our undergraduate students enjoy a 7:1 student-faculty ratio, a voice in governing the community, and individualized courses of study on a 350-acre campus in the hills of southern Vermont. Marlboro College is an Equal Opportunity employer. The faculty, students, and staff share a commitment to diversity and the values of equality, inclusion, and respect for all human differences.

Application consideration begins immediately. All applicants must apply online at http://www.marlboro.edu/offices/hr/jobs/faculty/ . Electronic attachments to the online application should include: a curriculum vitae; a letter of application including statements on teaching philosophy, teaching experience, and research interest; and evidence of effective teaching including course evaluations if available. In addition, applicants will need to provide the names and contact information for three references who can speak to their teaching.

 

Application Information
Contact: Margaret Hunt
Office of the Deans
Marlboro College
Phone: 802-258-9240
Fax: 802-257-4154
Online App. Form: http://www.marlboro.edu/offices/hr/jobs/faculty/

July

Job Opp: UC Denver lecturer

July 25, 2012

Here’s a great opportunity for MA and MFA grads!

Position Description: Creative Writing Lecturer

The Department of English in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Colorado Denver, seeks a lecturer of Creative Writing with a specialization in Fiction. An MFA or PhD in Creative Writing, and a demonstrable record of excellence in teaching is required (on campus and online). The position is for the fall term, beginning August 1st, 2012, and the lecturer is asked to teach two intermediate fiction courses: one online and one on campus.

The downtown campus is located in the heart of the city’s commercial, cultural and recreational district. Its location in downtown Denver attracts a diverse population, comprising primarily commuters, many of whom are non-traditional students. This diversity is enriched by our commitment to a philosophy of inclusion, embedded in all aspects of campus life from its community members, curriculum, research and community service, allowing for the creation of a learning environment that welcomes, embraces, sustains and celebrates the unique and shared experiences of faculty, staff and students.

Required Education/Experience/Skills (Minimum Qualifications): As a minimum requirement, the candidate must have an MA in the applicable field (or in a closely related field) and teaching experience.

Desired Qualifications: Preference will be given to those instructors whose qualification most fit the teaching area with attention to experience teaching in a public university.

Special Instructions to Applicants: Applications are available at http://www.jobsatcu.com. The posting number is 818343. Review of applications will continue until the position is filled.

Please include 1) a letter of intent that outlines qualifications; 2) CV that includes teaching experience; 3) names, addresses, daytime telephone numbers, and email addresses for three professional references; and 4) a sample syllabi (creative writing classes preferred).

The successful applicant must pass a background investigation prior to employment.

Any questions about the position should be directed to Brian Barker (brian.barker(at)ucdenver.edu).

Salary is commensurate with skills and experience. The University of Colorado offers a full benefits package. Information on University benefits programs, including eligibility, is located at http://www.cu.edu/pbs/.

The University of Colorado Denver is dedicated to ensuring a safe and secure environment for our faculty, staff, students and visitors. To assist in achieving that goal, we conduct background investigations for all prospective employees. Some positions may require a motor vehicle records check.

The University of Colorado is committed to diversity and equality in education and employment.

August

A Week in Provincetown: Mailer Center

August 29, 2012

A Week in Provincetown

By Patricia Florio

If you’ve ever had a dream come true, or received a wonderful compliment, or someone really special came into your life when you needed him or her most, that’s how it felt when I received notice that I had been a finalist in the 2012 Norman Mailer Fellowship Contest and I could choose two weeks in Provincetown at the Norman Mailer Center. I settled on one week to keep my life and my family’s life uncomplicated.

We were nine nonfiction writers sitting around the conference table in Norman Mailer’s house under the guidance of Dr. J. Michael Lennon.  Six of us had never met before.  Three of us were alumni from the Wilkes Creative Writing Program.

We all were in awe of our surroundings as Norman Mailer’s energy filled the room.  Dr. Lennon gave us a tour of the home early on Sunday morning. You have to experience this tour through his home to understand the magnanimous legacy that he left behind. His office and writing desk were exactly as he left it on the day he died.  Books surrounded him.  Papers, drawings, ideas on index cards filled his desk.  We were on the third floor of his home looking at the view of Provincetown.  A view, we were told, that Norman Mailer loved.

Every morning as we entered the house, the view of the beach and Cape Cod Bay filled our eyes. Dr. Lennon’s voice filled our ears.  It was the perfect storm for creative juices to flow.  And flow they did.

Young, Andrew, and Diane seated to my right hailed from Los Angeles CA, Lexington KY, and Brooklyn NY, along with all of the other writers, listened attentively as Patrick, across the table, shared his creative ideas for his book. Patrick is a state court judge from Chicago who has fought a tough fight for justice over the past forty years. Directly after his pitch that involved a fire in his building where his secretary and friends were killed, trapped inside a stairwell, is when our discussions took shape.  We elaborated on our critique for his opening chapters. Our minds worked on overtime, much to everyone’s delight. Patrick wrote down our suggestions. I think everyone of us would agree we would have stayed around that table discussing ideas through the night, if they would have let us.  But there are house rules at the Mailer Colony.  By six o’clock we all had to be off the premises. Most days we broke at four and sat on the deck together as boats went by, people swam in the bay, and our minds churned over the day’s events.

We were a forceful team thirty minutes into our first session. It’s amazing how it all happened. We bonded like glue; nine people who didn’t have a relationship when we entered the room became a force of creative power.  We were like a thunderbolt of electricity.  Light bulb after light bulb went off in our minds as we went around the table reading each other’s work.

Nick from Miami was working on a memoir he completed for Kindle Short: an exceptional piece of polished work that blew the rest of us writers away. Peggy from Dallas shared her memoir and memories of Paris, a love story that captured our souls.  Nicole from Boston is working on her dissertation for her PhD about Norman Mailer’s Ancient Evenings.  We worked extensively on this brilliant piece filling in the blanks for readers to understand how complicated his novel is to decipher.  Rachael from Wilkes-Barre struggled with the opening of her of memoir, as did I with my new memoir.  By the end of the week we sailed into the room, perhaps a bit tired, but we all made amazing breakthroughs in our work.

You can’t put a figure on what we received and gave each another that week.  And you can’t put a dollar amount on how blessed we were to have Dr. Lennon as our facilitator. A week for writers at Provincetown: Priceless!

***

Patricia A. Florio is the author of My Two Mothers and a graduate of the Wilkes University MA/MFA programs. She writes travel related articles for Striped Pot and lives in Ocean Grove, New Jersey. Find Patricia online athttp://about.me/patricia8.

Call for Female MFA Graduates and Students: Damselfly Press

August 22, 2012

damselfly press, an online literary journal for women, is pleased to announce our twentieth issue dedicated to female MFA graduates and students.

We are seeking electronic submissions of original fiction, poetry, and nonfiction by female writers only. The twenty-first issue of damselfly presswill be available October 15th, 2012. If you’d like to submit, please first visit our guidelines section at http://damselflypress.net/submissions and send us your submission by September 15th, 2012.

These are the e-mails per genre editor:

Fiction- <jennifer(at)damselflypress.net>replace (at) with @)

Poetry- <lesley(at)damselflypress.net>

Nonfiction- <nonfiction(at)damselflypress.net>

Fiction Writing Contest: Family Circle

August 15, 2012

 

Family Circle 2012 Fiction Writing Contest

http://www.familycircle.com/family-fun/fiction/fiction-contest-rules-2012/

One (1) Grand Prize winner will receive a check for $750.00, a mediabistro.com course of his or her choice, up to a value of $610.00, a one-year mediabistro.com AvantGuild membership valued at $55.00, and a one year mediabistro.com How-to Video membership valued at $99.00. The Grand Prize winner’s story may, in the sole discretion of Sponsor, be published in a future issue of Family Circle magazine. One (1) Second Place winner will receive a check for $250.00, a one-year mediabistro.com AvantGuild membership valued at $55.00, and a one-year mediabistro.com How-to Video membership valued at $99.00. One Third Place winner will receive a check for $250.00 and a one-year mediabistro.com AvantGuild membership valued at $55.00. Runner ups’ stories may, in the sole discretion of Sponsor, appear on familycircle.com. Subject to Official Rules athttp://www.familycircle.com/fictionrules. To enter, send your original (written by entrant), unpublished, fictional short story of no more
than 2,500 words to:

Family Circle Fiction Contest
c/o Family Circle Magazine
805 Third Avenue, 22nd Floor
New York, NY 10022

All entries must be typed, double-spaced, and page-numbered on 8-1/2-x-11-inch paper, and must include your name, address, daytime phone number and e-mail address (optional). No purchase necessary to enter or win. Contest begins March 1, 2012, and ends September 7, 2012. All entries must be postmarked on or before September 7, 2012, and received by September 14, 2012. Entries must be original (written by entrant), unpublished and may not have won any prize or award. Up to two (2) entries per individual will be accepted, but each entry must be a unique short story. Open to amateur writers who are legal residents of the 50 United States or the District of Columbia, age 21 or older. Void where prohibited.

Sponsor: Meredith Corporation.

Hippocampus CNF Contest Judges Announced

August 8, 2012

A memoirist whose life story was turned into a popular movie. A prolific literary travel writer. An award-winning essayist. Hippocampus Magazine is honored to announce our guest judges for the Remember in November Contest for Creative Nonfiction. Our three panelists bring with them decades of collective literary and publishing experience spanning genres and professions.

The contest, which will award $400+ in prizes, is accepting works of creative nonfiction of up to 3,500 words until Sept. 15, 2012. Winning stories will be published in the November 2012 issue of Hippocampus, coinciding with National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month. A portion of the $10 contest entry fee will benefit the organization.

To learn more about the contest and view submissions guidelines, visit ourRemember in November Contest for Creative Nonfiction page.

New book by faculty member David Poyer

August 1, 2012

The ever-prolific writer and faculty mentor David Poyer has a new release available. David Stick calls Happier than This Day and Time: An Oral History of the Outer Banks of North Carolina “A major contribution to the preservation of the lore and heritage of the Outer Banks.”

Book Description

How much would you give to talk quietly for just one hour with your great-grandmother? Most likely, almost anything. But probably you can’t buy it at any price. Time’s torrent rushes by, isolating us like a hurricane-driven tide, the rising sea cutting us off from those who went before. It bears away the old voices and the old ways. Bears away too much of what we loved, and what we realize, too late, we still desperately need.

This book’s a bridge to that past. In a series of interviews conducted in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s, nine old people recounted their lives on a string of isolated islands of the North Carolina coast. The Outer Banks are a hundred-mile arch of barrier islands, from a few thousand feet to three miles across, punctuated by narrow inlets to the Atlantic. Low, backed by wide brackish sounds, they’re lands of the margin; half-land, half-sea; shaped by the eternal struggle of sea-currents, vulnerable to hurricane and war. These nine survivors tell of childhood, courting, marriage, and children; of hurricanes, depressions, wars, and death; of faith, doubt, love, and fear. They watched the Wright brothers fly; saw U-boats torpedo ships close offshore; dealt with blindness and heartbreak and shipwreck. Then, near the end of their voyages, they lingered for a little while to tell us of The Way Things Were.

And they’ll tell us more — if we’ll listen. With a little urging, they’ll share their thoughts on the ultimate questions; good and evil, youth and age, triumph and suffering. From their first word, they cast a spell.

Welcome to the past.

Happier than This Day and Time: An Oral History of the Outer Banks of North Carolina is available on Kindle at Amazon or on Nook at B&N for a mere $3.99.

Visit David Poyer’s website: http://www.poyer.com/

September

2013 AWP Opportunities for Students & Faculty

September 26, 2012

The M.A./M.F.A. Wilkes programs are once again sponsors for AWP’s (Association of Writers and Writing Programs) national conference to be held in Boston, March 6-9, 2013! That means Wilkes will have 45 FREE registrations for students and faculty wishing to attend the conference.

As in years past, Wilkes will have a booth shared withEtruscan Press in the Book Fair. We need a handful of student volunteers to work the booth during the conference; please call Dawn Leas to register and/or volunteer no later than October 1!

The 2013 AWP Conference & Bookfair takes place March 6-9, 2013 in Boston. This year’s conference Keynote Speakers are Seamus Heaney and Derek Walcott. See a full list of accepted 2013 readings and panels here.

Psst. Keep your eyes out for the return of the highly acclaimed All Collegiate Slam, hosted by Misterjim and the Wilkes writing programs!

Best of the Net Anthology Seeks Submissions

September 19, 2012

Sundress Publications is excited to announce that submissions are open for the seventh volume of the Best of the Net Anthology!

The internet continues to be a rapidly evolving medium for the distribution of new and innovative literature, and the Best of the Net Anthology aims to nurture the relationship between writers and the web. In our first six years of existence, the anthology has published distinguished writers such as Claudia Emerson, B.H. Fairchild, Ron Carlson, Dorianne Laux, and Jill McCorkle alongside numerous new and emerging writers from around the world.

Nomincations for the 2012 edition must be sent to <bestofthenet(at)sundresspublications.com> (replace (at) with @ in sending email) between July 1st and September 30th, 2012.

Further submission guidelines can be found at http://www.sundresspublications.com/bestof/

Q&A with alum Gale Martin

September 12, 2012

Recent Wilkes graduate Gale Martin is soaring to the top with her latest release, Grace Unexpected. The book recently reached #1 status for Amazon’s list of Movers and Shakers thanks to a 3-day book giveaway. Even after the freebie, the sales keep coming in not only for this most recent release, but her 2011 book Don Juan in Hankey, PA as well. See what Gale has to say about her publication experience in this Q&A.

Thousands of readers have downloaded a copy of the novel from Amazon. Sometimes the book has even been offered for free on Kindle. How do downloads and free copies help your overall marketing efforts?

Once an independent author sells her book to the 100-200 people she personally knows, she needs a vehicle to massively enhance the visibility of her title. A very tiny percentage of people—perhaps one for every 1,000—will actually respond to any sort of messaging or marketing with an actual book purchase or an action. If you have 300 followers on your Facebook fan page, that may seem like a big deal to you, but statistically speaking, it’s not likely to yield many sales. I have close to 3,000 followers on my two Twitter accounts, which is expected to yield a sale of 3+ books, and it did yield dozens more than that because I’d done a great deal of relationship mining prior to DON JUANand GRACE U‘s publication. But I can’t expect those kinds of follower numbers to greatly impact my sales.

Basically, the Kindle Free days are a tool to reach tens of thousands of potential readers who will then help boost paid sales. And it worked. During my three Free Kindle days in early September, more than 38,300 readers downloaded GRACE UNEXPECTED for free. In the next 36 hours, it sold 400 copies. And it’s still highly ranked. It sounds counterintuitive, but in order to get reviews, I have to give away 100 or more copies. In order to get the requisite word of mouth—the buzz—needed to sell books in volume, tens of thousands of people have to have heard about my book. Kindle Free campaigns are one tool indie authors can use to reach a certain threshold of visibility (lacking the big media campaigns of the Big Six publishers.)

Speaking of marketing efforts, can you tell us a bit about what lead you to the ‘Don Juan Gets Around’ contest?

Well, that was a funny, organic sort of campaign that evolved because a geographic location is referenced in the title. One of my video reviewers, an opera singer, responded so strongly to Hankey, PA, that he recorded his professional performing group The American Tenors, singing “Hankey, PA” during one of his East Coast gigs. Then a friend took the book to scenic St. Barth’s just after it was published. Then, he posted the photo of Don on Facebook. And other people who had bought the book began sending me photos from their parts of the world–Staffordshire, England; Yosemite National Park; the Paris Opera; Seoul, Korea; Florida; Salem, Mass.; Mt. Rushmore; Shanghai; and of course, the winning photo was taken in Puerto Rico. It was great fun receiving photos ofDON JUAN from around the country and the world.

Grace Unexpected was recently picked for best designed covers by Shelfbuzz.com. Congrats! Tell us about the book design process and how this cover came to be.

This is a fantastic process with Booktrope. Basically, you talk with your book manager about what qualities you want your cover to project. Then, the designer who has elected to work with you tries to match your vision. It took ten iterations before my manager, Booktrope’s COO, and I agreed on a cover. It was great fun to see it evolve, to see it refined from draft to draft. I needed it to project energy and lightness. Bright colors convey lightness. I also wanted to show scenic Shaker Village which is the location for the book’s inciting incident. Designer Greg Simanson is really a genius. And also really listens. Because everyone knows indie books need great covers to sell well. And Booktrope is firmly committed to that.

You’re pretty active on Facebook. How has social media helped develop your author platform?

I can’t imagine being an indie author and achieving any success (which I define as having your work read and appreciated) without relying on social media. Book reviewers are more inclined to review your work if you have the capability to Tweet or Share their review. Every blog post I write is magnified and can obtain more Google juice because it can be broadcast via Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Reddit, etc. Let’s face it, since time immemorial, word of mouth has sold books, and social media offers viral word of mouth. If one person endorses your novel on their Facebook page, all their friends take their recommendations very seriously, especially if the poster is a thought leader. In looking at my analytics over time, Facebook sends more traffic to my website and blog than any other single source. So, if writers can’t embrace more than one social media outlet, they should at least establish a Facebook fan page.

How did the Wilkes program prepare you for your publication experience?

For one thing, you leave the program with clear expectations that Wilkes wants you to publish. They expect you to try your level best to get published. Another thing—I’ve done a lot of author events since first being published in November of 2011. And the Wilkes program definitely helps prepare authors to present their writing. I did an author event with a Big Six author. He didn’t know how to read or showcase his work at the event in which we both participated. Thanks to the Wilkes program, I and every Wilkes-trained author I’ve presented with absolutely kills personal appearances. Also, I have tapped my fellow students and faculty members for endorsements and blurbs. So, overall, I would say my Wilkes preparation was invaluable to my feeling confident and projecting a professional writer’s image.

Final thoughts?

I feel very fortunate to have found Booktrope and to have been embraced by them. They work so hard—tirelessly—to help the authors they represent to succeed. It’s like being part of a very caring family. Within that family are authors like me who have had literary representation at one time and/or who have sought representation for years and haven’t succeeded. Emerging authors need to know there are other models available for publication, additional avenues besides the Big Six. I’ve gotten so much satisfaction from the publication of my novels. It’s less important to readers who publishes your novel—just that it’s published. And you don’t have to self-publish, which offers no appeal to me whatsoever. Not with publishers like Booktrope around who provide support and expertise for authors on every level—editing, proofreading, cover design, marketing, and promotion.

Gale Martin is scheduled to participate in Pat Florio’s (another Wilke’s alum!) author showcase on September 23: Writers Showcase in Belmar, NJ, 608 River Road, 3 PM to 5:30 PM.

More news and events from Gale Martin are posted on her website,http://galemartin.me.

Another Literary Genre to Consider: The Book Review

September 5, 2012

by Brian Fanelli

For years, my writing experience has been limited to poetry, academic papers, and a stint as a news reporter and freelance music journalist. Within the last year, I overcame some trepidation and tried a new genre – the book review. I’ve contributed reviews to PANK’s blog, and more recently to Poets’ Quarterly as part of my role as a contributing editor. Serving as a book reviewer has had several benefits. It has allowed me to support local presses and first book authors, understand what types of poetry small and larger indie presses publish, and see firsthand the various techniques, styles, and forms that exist in the vast world of contemporary poetry. Reviewing books has also been a positive networking experience.

If it wasn’t for the world of small presses, poetry would be even more secluded than it is today. Small presses help keep the genre alive and take risks on first time authors. For PANK andPoets’ Quarterly, most of the books on our review lists come from small presses, and I’m sure it is the same for most other journals that offer reviews. Writing a review is one way to support the press and spread the word about their authors, especially to readers that don’t have the funds or time to attend AWP or other large literary conferences where these presses are visible. Over the last year, I’ve been exposed to several poetry presses due to the reviews I’ve written, including some larger indies, such as BlazeVOX, and several smaller ones, including H_NG M_N Books, Bottom Dog Press, Brick Road Poetry Press, and several others. This has been especially helpful as a poet because now I have a better understanding of what type of work these presses publish in case I want to send them a manuscript at some point.

I also have a clearer idea of what is currently being published in the ever-changing world of contemporary poetry. Small presses take a greater chance on cutting edge authors willing to engage in more experimental forms. As a writer, I want to know what’s currently being published and how it reacts to and challenges previous poetic traditions and forms.

Writing reviews can be a wonderful networking opportunity. Frequently, after one of my reviews appears, the writer will contact me via e-mail, my website, or Facebook. These relationships can lead to invitations to share the stage for a reading or attend a conference. It’s also likely the writer you reviewed will tweet, Facebook, and share your review in other ways, so it helps expose your byline.

If you’re looking for ways to fill extra time, or to take a break from the genre you’re most accustomed to writing in, then try writing a book review. Newspapers often seek columnists to review books, and so do literary journals. The experience is beneficial because it offers insight into what’s out there in the publishing world, and it is an invaluable networking opportunity.

***

Brian Fanelli is an alumni of the Wilkes Unviersity M.F.A. program. His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Inkwell, Red Rock Review, The Portland Review, Boston Literary Magazine, Rockhurst Review, Solstice Literary Magazine, San Pedro River Review, Evening Street Review, Harpur Palate, and other publications. He is the author of one chapbook of poems,Front Man (Big Table Publishing), and his first full-length book of poems will be published in 2013 by Unbound Content. He is a contributing editor toPoets’ Quarterly and currently teaches writing at Keystone College.

 

October

Single Copy Lit Mags via NewPages

October 31, 2012

It may be a challenge to find a wide assortment of literary journals at your local bookseller these days—if you still have a local bookseller in your town. Thankfully, the fine folks at NewPages.com have developed an up-to-the-minute web store where readers can pick up single copies of journals—no subscription required!

A quick look at the current featured journals includesNew Ohio Review, Cimarron Review, and Salamander. The complete listing includes national and international favorites as well as a few new kids on the block. It’s definitely worth a look if you’re looking to fill the gap between AWP’s incredible access to mags in the bookfair.

Flat fee shipping means it’s best to grab a few. Why pay $3 shipping for one mag when you can throw in a few more journals at no additional shipping cost?

Have a look at the offerings, let the NewPages.com folks know what you think, and spread the word. 

Visit the online shop here:

http://www.newpageswebstore.com/

From the Archives: Ten Ideas for Keepin’ it Real

October 24, 2012

When Amye Archer took care of The Write Life posts back in the day, she invited fellow Wilkie Gale Martin to contribute something for this blog. Gale’s piece has as much relevance today as ever, so what better way to get tips on writing than from someone with personal experience and staying power….

Originally posted May 12, 2011

Preparing for writing success demands common sense and self care

by Gale Martin

You’ve just completed your novel, your memoir, or your chapbook. You’ve gotten strong feedback from your beta-reader(s) or an outside evaluator through the Wilkes University Creative Writing program where you’ve received unprecedented access to the almighty gatekeepers—agents and editors. Maybe you attended a conference and pitched your book to an agent who requested a complete manuscript. Nothing can stop you now. Surely, you’ll have a publishing contract in hand within months, right?

Maybe. Maybe not. According to Putting Your Passion into Print, more than 150,000 books are conventionally published every year. That’s an incredibly large number of publishing opportunities compared to the number of screenplays actually made into feature length films every year. There’s plenty of room for good books—yours included.

Statistics such as ‘less than five percent of popular booksellers total sales are bestsellers’ provide reason enough to be optimistic that you may one day join the ranks of published authors. That is, if you don’t expect too much success too soon. That’s the fastest route to burnout. Expecting to be the next overnight writing sensation might be the single greatest handicap to the writing career you so desperately seek. Prepare instead for a long slog. Commit yourself and your faculties to writerly habits and a lifestyle that can sustain you and your writing career.

Keep writing.  After I wrote my first novel in 2005, I was so proud of the fact that I’d completed a work of fiction, I used to carry it around with me wherever I went. After a few months, a pair of tired arms, and only one nibble from an agent, I realized that completing a novel was only the beginning of my writerly journey. I began writing flash fiction, short stories, and humorous essays while I began plotting my next novel. One of the writers I follow on Twitter who is also a literary agent never sold his first book—the one he was certain would sell. But sold plenty after that. So, keep writing. It’s never good to pin your hopes to one manuscript.

Not to mention that editors and agents want writers who are good for more than one book. One of the Wilkes’ faculty members Lenore Hart sold her latest book The Raven’s Bride before it was written. Her publisher was banking on Lenore’s reputation for producing another publishable novel.

Keep submitting other work elsewhere.  As long as you continue writing, you’ll not only be honing your craft, have work to submit to publications and contests. For most of us, rejections far outweigh acceptances. You have to submit a critical level of work before the odds start turning in your favor. Once they do, every acceptance is validation to stay the course and builds confidence which you’ll need for more rejections and the inevitable slog.

Set reasonable goals.  In recent craft classes at Wilkes, writer Lori A. Mayshared a framework for goal setting for a rich, focused writing career. Her model encourages writers to think in bigger chunks beyond the next story, the next month, the next acceptance. Set goals that will stretch you. But don’t doom yourself to failure either by comparing yourself to someone who’s achieved instant publishing success or setting irrational goals, such as, “Will have literary representation in one month.” Perhaps you won’t. I just interviewed a writer on my blog Scrivengale who has published four books but doesn’t have an agent. Make your goal instead, “Will query five agents every month.”

Volunteer to judge a contest. Reading others writers’ work with whom you’re not competing head to head, within your cohort or in the Wilkes program in general, can be eye-opening. It’s a productive way to learn from others’ mistakes and successes while being a good literary citizen.

Look for outlets to read your work. If none exist, create one. One of thegreat privileges published authors enjoy is the chance to read their work in public venues. In the Wilkes program, students are given several opportunities to do that. Once you’re out of the program, it’s one of the things you miss most.

At least I did because I love reading my work. Not seeing anything available in her hometown, one of the students in my cohort Ally Bishop went out and created an outlet for writers in Central Pennsylvania to read their work—published and unpublished—readings in which I’ve taken part. I know other Wilkes students are following Ally’s example, approaching galleries, book shops, and coffee shops about offering literary readings.

Get a writing group together. Writing is an insular life. If you don’t have an editor to give you pause to think about your narrative arc, to redirect your work, you would probably benefit from participating in a writing group. I said a writing group, not a shredding group. I’ve been in a shredding group—an utter waste of time and potentially devastating. If you can find a handful of other writers committed to careful reading and constructive criticism, it helps fill the gap left between working with a faculty mentor or a professional editor and writing in solitude.

Explore other avenues of sharing your work, like Scribd. I just learned about www.scribd.com, a social publishing site, where tens of millions of people share original writings and documents. One young woman who wrote a memoir but couldn’t obtain any interest from a conventional publisher, shared her memoir in segments on Scribd, obtaining three thousand readers per post. Few bloggers can attract that volume of readership. It may be worth your time investigating.

Write something for sheer enjoyment. I’m not sure where I heard about this online writing community at The Write Idea, an international group of poets and prose writers, but for three years now I have participated in a nine-round fiction contest with some of the most generous, talented writers I’ve ever met. It is sheer fun to receive the prompts, chat them up on the site, and see how everyone fares following each round of judging. This contest is something I do just for the love of writing and as such, the sustenance it offers me is invaluable.

Create something for sheer enjoyment. I read Jane Friedman’s blog There Are No Rules  regularly, which is how I learned about Scribd. In one of her columns, Jane also mentioned a site called About.me, which allows writers and other creatives the chance to create a free splash page, in lieu of a full-blown website. It was a great exercise trying to encapsulate my writing experience and persona into a splash page and lots of fun doing so.

Strive for a more balanced life. Shortly after I finished the Wilkes program, I needed a month to thaw out, having combined my studies with demanding full-time jobs. Then I looked around my very untidy house, threw myself into some cleaning projects, and planned an anniversary celebration. I also recommitted myself to regular church attendance and singing in the choir, which meant rehearsing one night a week away from my *sigh* laptop, which I was certain was attached to my fingers. I don’t know if I’ll ever have the level of life balance I enjoyed before I began writing creatively, but the writing schedule a master’s or MFA program demands wasn’t going to sustain my marriage or a life well-lived. I simply had to make some changes.

To outsiders, it may appear that I’ve ratcheted down my expectations for my publishing career, but that’s not an accurate assessment of my approach to my post-Wilkes writing. I’m merely steeling myself for a long slog but fully intending to appreciate any smaller success along the way.

Gale Martin

Gale Martin is a Wilkes alum. Since graduating, she has had several publications including the novels Grace, Unexpected and Don Juan in Hankey, PA.

Call for Proposals: Anthology for Instructors

October 17, 2012

Here’s an opportunity to share:

Call for Abstracts: ‘Creative Composition: Inspiration and Techniques for Writing Instruction’ —an essay anthology.

We seek essays that examine concrete approaches to teaching writing in several venues, across the spectrum.

Abstracts (250-500 words) for proposed essays must be received by Nov 30, 2012.

Notifications and invitations for full essays will be sent by Jan 4, 2013.

Invited essays (2,500-7,500 words) are due by March 1, 2013.

For more details and to see the Submission Guidelines please visit:http://creativecompositioncfp.blogspot.com/

CW Program featured in Beacon

October 10, 2012

Last week, The Beacon’s A&E Editor Bill Thomas ran a feature story demonstrating the success of the Wilkes creative writing program, highlighting alum publications.

Taylor M. Polites is included in the list of interviewees discussing his runaway hit with The Rebel Wife; Jonathan Rocks shares his experience with screenwriting and optioning his film, Luke Whimsey; and Laurie Powers discusses her projects and why she came back for an MFA.

Read the full feature in The Beacon here:http://www.thewilkesbeacon.com/arts-entertainment/2012/10/02/creative-writing-grads-brings-visions-to-life/

Field Guide to Writing Flash Nonfiction

October 5, 2012

The Rose Metal Press Field Guide to Writing Flash Nonfiction: Advice and Essential Exercises from Respected Writers, Editors, and Teachers
Edited by Dinty W. Moore
Rose Metal Press, 2012
ISBN 978-0-9846166-6-4
$15.95, 180 pages

Link to purchase

Writers of nonfiction will find this new craft guide, edited by Dinty W. Moore, a useful resource for approaching the personal essay. For flash nonfiction, and working with less than a thousand words, the challenge is to capture a whole world of a story in the most concise manner possible—while still providing the satisfaction readers expect.

The Rose Metal Press Field Guide to Writing Flash Nonfiction includes 26 essays from writers like Carol Guess, Judith Kitchen, and Lee Martin. The “thingy-ness” that makes flash nonfiction work is explored by Anne Panning while voice in the short form is discussed by a variety of authors in differing perspectives.

Each contributor begins with a craft discussion, and then a prompt follows for you to try your hand at the technique. Sample flash pieces are also shared to give an idea of how the author has him/herself approached the topic at hand.

As a resource for the graduate writer, The Rose Metal Press Field Guide to Writing Flash Nonfiction will push you beyond what you already know about structure and storytelling, and help you focus on the harder-to-define elements to take your writing to a new level.

Raves for David Poyer’s latest work

October 3, 2012

David Poyer, Wilkes faculty member and ever-prolific writer, was recently featured on the blog“Our Stories by Paul Clancy: Columns in the Virginian-Pilot.”

In Happier than this Day and Time, Poyer introduces us to eight individuals rooted in the Outer Banks of North Carolina. In this “Oral History,” we are taken to another time, another place, where real life voices are revisited. Conversations stem from interviews conducted in the late 1970s and early 1980s, with folks who look back on their isolation in the Outer Banks.

Here’s what readers have to say:

“A major contribution to the preservation of the lore and heritage of the Outer Banks.” — David Stick

“The voices ring with authenticity.” — Paul Clancy, Norfolk Virginian-Pilot

“Many of us who came of age before WWII harbor an abiding belief that life back then was slower, simpler and infinitely richer in human connections. In this collection of eight personal narratives from old-time Outer Banks residents, David Poyer provides compelling evidence that this is indeed true.” – Joan La Blanc, amazon reader

Happier than this Day and Time is available from Northampton House andthe Kindle edition is selling for a mere $3.99

November

Alum Tara Caimi: On Writing, Patience, and Publishing

November 28, 2012

We’re proud of Wilkes alum Tara Caimi for the publication of her craft essay, “Privileged Perspective in Memoir: Building the Bridge of Trust by Trusting the Reader.” This essay appears in the current print edition of AWP’s The Writer’s Chronicle (December 2012). AWP members may also access the article online here.

That’s not all Tara has been up to. She’s been busy submitting excerpts of her memoir and has seen a number of these picked up by literary journals. When we asked Tara what the process was like and how she approached dissecting a larger work for a smaller page-count, she had this to say:

“Trying to mold sections or chapters of my narrative memoir into standalone pieces has been a great learning experience. It helped me to see the chapters from a different perspective and to fine-tune them with greater attention to certain details. I think the chapters I revised with intent to submit as standalone pieces are stronger now. Each has its own narrative arc, and I think of these sections as stories within the larger story. It has also been fun to share the memoir with readers through these shorter, representative pieces.”

Tara is a persistent and dedicated professional. We all receive rejections; we all share the ups and downs of the waiting game. These are part and parcel of the process, the Wilkes alum says.

“As far as perseverance goes, I don’t see how a person could be a writer without this quality. Not only is what we do hard work, it is also a leap of faith every time we pick up a pen or sit down at our computers to write. We don’t know if our work will turn out as we plan or even, at times, if we’ll finish.”

For more on the writing life, visit Tara’s blog: http://taracaimi.com/

 

Tara Caimi holds an MFA in creative writing from Wilkes University. Excerpts from her memoir, Mush, have been published in the MacGuffin, Oh Comelymagazine, and by the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness. Her fiction has appeared in Fire & Knives. Tara is a communications specialist at Penn State, and a freelance writer in central Pennsylvania.

Wilkes Alum in latest issue of AWP Chronicle

November 21, 2012

Congratulations to Wilkes alum Tara Caimi for the publication of her craft essay, “Privileged Perspective in Memoir: Building the Bridge of Trust by Trusting the Reader.” This essay appears in the current print edition of AWP’s The Writer’s Chronicle (December 2012). AWP members may also access the article online here.

Here’s a preview:

“Establishing and maintaining credibility in the content and for the narrator helps to win the reader’s trust and enhance the overall believability of the memoir, but trust is never a one-way street.”

Tara Caimi holds an MFA in creative writing from Wilkes University. Excerpts from her memoir, Mush, have been published in the MacGuffin, Oh Comelymagazine, and by the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness. Her fiction has appeared in Fire & Knives. Tara is a communications specialist at Penn State, and a freelance writer in central Pennsylvania.

Congrats, Tara!

Application Deadline for January Admission

November 14, 2012

Acceptance into the Master of Arts in Creative Writing program operates on a rolling admissions basis; however, to meet deadlines, completed applications for January Residency entrance into program must be received as follows:

  • December 15 for regular admission
  • December 1 to be considered for Graduate Assistantships

The Master of Arts in Creative Writing is a 30-credit, low-residency program with tracks in fiction, poetry, screenwriting, playwriting, and/or creative nonfiction.

To graduate from our Master of Arts in Creative Writing program students will produce and present a full-length text and support materials that demonstrate the mastery of requisite standards, processes, and procedures for bringing that project into its appropriate public venue.

The Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing is the M.A. (30 Credits) plus 18-credit, low-residency program optional continuation of the Master of Arts in Creative Writing. The Master of Fine Arts is a terminal degree in the Creative Writing field. Students interested in the Master of Fine Arts MUST first complete the Wilkes University Master of Arts in Creative Writing. Students in the existing M.A. may apply for admission into the M.F.A. no earlier than the last term of the M.A. Graduating with a M.F.A. will require students to revise their M.A. thesis to produce a publishable manuscript, or begin a new project. Additionally, they will produce and present a literary analysis paper, complete a term-long internship in teaching or publishing and submit a final portfolio that chronicles their work in the entire program.

In both programs, you will train to be a professional creative writer by examining

  • the personal life of a writer;
  • the craft, technique, and analysis of creative writing;
  • the art delivery method for one’s work.

Full application and admission info: http://wilkes.edu/pages/496.asp

Contest Opportunities Recently Announced

November 7, 2012

Have you been polishing a manuscript? A series of poems or a short story? You may want to check out these recently announced contests…

Creative Nonfiction

Online submissions/postmark deadline: January 15, 2013. For a special “Sustainability” issue and book, Creative Nonfiction is looking for true stories/essays that illuminate environmental, economic, ethical and/or social challenges related to the state of the planet and our future. Deadline January 15, 2013. Best essay prize awarded by guest editor Donna Seaman. For more information: www.creativenonfiction.org.

***

2013 Colorado Prize for Poetry

$2,000 honorarium and book publication. Submit book-length collection of poems to the Colorado Prize for Poetry by January 14, 2013. Final judge is Stephen Burt. $25 entry fee includes subscription to Colorado Review (to US addresses only). coloradoreview.colostate.edu/colorado-prize-for-poetry/

***

Crazyhorse Prizes in Fiction, Nonfiction, and Poetry

Entries accepted online from January 1st to January 31st. Winners receive $2,000 plus publication; all manuscripts will be considered for publication. This year’s judges: Tony Earley (Fiction), Lia Purpura (Nonfiction), and Martha Collins (Poetry). $20 entry fee includes a one-year subscription toCrazyhorse. Upload your story, essay, or 3 poems through our website:crazyhorse.cofc.edu

 ***

The Rose Metal PressAnnual Short Short Chapbook Contest

Online Submission Deadline: December 1, 2012. The Rose Metal Press Seventh Annual Short Short Chapbook Contest submission period begins November 1 and ends December 1, 2012. Our 2012 judge will be Deb Olin Unferth. The winner will have his/her chapbook published in summer 2013, with an introduction by the contest judge. During the submission period, please submit your 25–40 page double-spaced manuscript of short short stories (fiction or nonfiction) each under 1000 words to us through our Submittable page with a $10 reading fee. More details at www.rosemetalpress.com/Submit/Submit.html.

December

Time to Register! Publishing Seminar Jan. 7-13

December 26, 2012

Wilkes University Creative Writing Program Offers Publishing Seminar, Jan. 7-13

By Vicki Mayk

The graduate creative writing program at Wilkes University, Wilkes-Barre, PA, will offer a one-week in-depth literary publishing seminar, The Art and Science of Literary Publishing, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Jan. 7 through Friday, Jan. 13, 2013 on the Wilkes University campus.

wilkes-university-grad-logoThe Art and Science of Literary Publishing course includes information about the current publishing environment, from large to small presses, including corporate, independent, non-profit, university, multi-media and self-publishing models. There will be discussions about editorial policies, book design, distribution, business models, marketing, sales of manuscripts, legal issues, author events and much more.

Instructors are Phil Brady, who is the executive director of Etruscan Press, and Johnny Temple, who is the publisher and editor-in-chief of Akashic Books.

Etruscan Press is an independent, nonprofit publisher that has produced more than forty books, including three that went on to become National Book Award finalists. Brady is a distinguished professor at Youngstown State University, where he directs the Poetry Center. Akashic Books is an award-winning Brooklyn-based independent company dedicated to publishing urban literary fiction and political nonfiction. Temple also is the cofounder of Brooklyn Wordsmiths, an editorial and consulting company. He also won the American Association of Publishers’ 2005 Miriam Bass Award for Creativity in Independent Publishing, and the 2010 Jay and Dean Kogan Award for Excellence in Noir Literature.

The course is geared toward people interested in exploring career opportunities in the burgeoning field of literary publishing and production. It may be taken for four graduate credits in conjunction with Wilkes’ creative writing master of arts and master of fine arts degree programs. Those people not taking the course for graduate credit will receive a certificate of completion following receipt of their final portfolio of written work by the instructors.

Cost for the seminar is $2,488, with substantially discounted rates for Wilkes University alumni and current students ($1,244).

For more information, or to register, call the Wilkes University graduate creative writing program at (570) 408-4547 or email cwriting@wilkes.edu.

New Contests and Opportunities!

December 19, 2012

Don’t miss these great opportunities to submit your work:

Omnidawn Open Poetry Book Contest

Winner receives $3,000, publication, and 100 copies.
Electronic & postal submissions accepted between November 1, 2012 – January 15, 2013.
Judge: Cole Swensen
Entry fee: $25.00

All entrants with a U.S. mailing address who pay an extra $3 to cover shipping costs will be mailed a copy of any Omnidawn book of their choice, or a copy of the winning book when it is published.

For more details: www.omnidawn.com/contest

***

Glimmer Train Fiction Open

Deadline: January 2, 2013

1st place: $2,500, publication in Glimmer Train, 20 copies

2nd place: $1,000

3rd place: $600 ($700 if chosen for publication)

Open to all subjects, all themes and all writers.

Submissions to the Fiction Open usually run from 2,000 to 8,000 words, but stories of any length from 2,000 to 20,000 words are fine. More details:http://www.glimmertrainpress.com.

***

Green Mountains Review – Neil Shepard Prize in Poetry and Ficton

Please consider submitting your work for our Green Mountains Review Prizes in Poetry and Fiction. First Prize winners will receive $500 and publication. Send up to three poems or one story, accompanied by a $15 reading fee. All writers will receive a free copy of the Fall 2013 prize issue in which the winners will be published, and all submissions will be considered for publica- tion. Please include an SASE and a cover letter with author’s name and contact information and titles of all entries submitted. The author’s name should appear nowhere on the manuscripts themselves. Additional work may be included by sending $3 per poem and $5 per story.

Fiction Judge:  Josip Novakovich
Poetry Judge:  Mark Halliday

Submission Deadline: April 13th 2013
All contest entries and their reading fees can be sent to:

Poetry Prize (or) Fiction Prize

GREEN MOUNTAINS REVIEW

Johnson State College

Johnson, VT 05656

All entries must be postmarked April 15, 2013 or earlier to be eligible for consideration.

Cohort to Cohort: Thesis Wisdom

December 12, 2012

With the January residency just around the corner, what better way to prepare for the master thesis term than hearing what those in the heat of things have to say? A sampling of students currently wrapping up the CW 520 course, Master Project Semester, have shared a few words of wisdom for the next cohort….

This is coming from an unorganized person, but organization is the key in the thesis semester. It’s a very hands-off term regarding mentors, so get out your calendar during residency and map out a specific plan of action. Mark your goals, i.e. reaching X amount of words or trying a new character, then note when you realistically plan to reach each goal and when to discuss them. That said, it is a creative project, so try to keep some elasticity in your plan. – Kait Burrier

***

Don’t procrastinate! – Heather Lowery

***

Write through it. Even when you think it’s not coming together, write through it! – Laura Duda

***

Plan ahead and carve time to revise and edit once the project is completed. This requires a lot of organization indeed. – Edith Trenou-Dackey

***

Start work before the semester officially begins so you aren’t rushing at the deadline. – Ashley Supinski

***

As with any endeavor, what you put in is exactly what you’ll get out. – Pauline Hill Threlkeld

***

Thanks to the current 520 group. Best wishes for those starting the intensive term ahead!

Wilkes Publishing Seminar: Jan 7-13, 2013

December 5, 2012

Wilkes University Creative Writing Program Offers Publishing Seminar, Jan. 7-13

By Vicki Mayk

The graduate creative writing program at Wilkes University, Wilkes-Barre, PA, will offer a one-week in-depth literary publishing seminar, The Art and Science of Literary Publishing, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Jan. 7 through Friday, Jan. 13, 2013 on the Wilkes University campus.

The Art and Science of Literary Publishing course includes information about the current publishing environment, from large to small presses, including corporate, independent, non-profit, university, multi-media and self-publishing models. There will be discussions about editorial policies, book design, distribution, business models, marketing, sales of manuscripts, legal issues, author events and much more.

Instructors are Phil Brady, who is the executive director of Etruscan Press, and Johnny Temple, who is the publisher and editor-in-chief of Akashic Books.

Etruscan Press is an independent, nonprofit publisher that has produced more than forty books, including three that went on to become National Book Award finalists. Brady is a distinguished professor at Youngstown State University, where he directs the Poetry Center. Akashic Books is an award-winning Brooklyn-based independent company dedicated to publishing urban literary fiction and political nonfiction. Temple also is the cofounder of Brooklyn Wordsmiths, an editorial and consulting company. He also won the American Association of Publishers’ 2005 Miriam Bass Award for Creativity in Independent Publishing, and the 2010 Jay and Dean Kogan Award for Excellence in Noir Literature.

The course is geared toward people interested in exploring career opportunities in the burgeoning field of literary publishing and production. It may be taken for four graduate credits in conjunction with Wilkes’ creative writing master of arts and master of fine arts degree programs. Those people not taking the course for graduate credit will receive a certificate of completion following receipt of their final portfolio of written work by the instructors.

Cost for the seminar is $2,488, with substantially discounted rates for Wilkes University alumni and current students ($1,244).

For more information, or to register, call the Wilkes University graduate creative writing program at (570) 408-4547 or email cwriting@wilkes.edu.

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